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Home » Kallithea » Field Trips » Seriously guys, wear pants! by Anna Borynec

Seriously guys, wear pants! by Anna Borynec

Every morning I walk from the school (where the girls are staying) to the apothiki (where all the archaeological magic happens). It takes about 10 minutes if you walk at a slow, meandering, I’m-not-awake-yet pace, like me. It helps to know that the sky is more likely to be blue than a dreary grey, and that there are always wildflowers growing on either side of the road. They lend a nice flash of colour to the landscape. They can be seen when walking anywhere in the village: on the way to work, on the way to the Ouzeri or the Taverna, and back again. I’m particular to the poppies which were in full bloom the first day I arrived. They’ve wilted a bit since then, as have the daisies, but new dashes of vibrant flora catch my eye everyday.

Narthaki is wonderful for people who like to stop and smell the roses, but in many ways Kastro Kallithea is even better. The dig site is ruled by a variety of striking purple flowers standing stark amongst stone or tucked into the greenery blanketing the hill. There are all kinds of interesting species dispersed around the area, and it’s easy to get a great look at them when I’m staring at my feet making sure I’m not about to trip over anything! Hiking from place to place in Kallithea can be a bit challenging when you’re on a narrow path or climbing a particularly steep incline, but it’s well worth it in the end. Each stop on our tour of Kallithea revealed a couple cool new plants to look at (and, of course, a neat excavation site) including this weird spiky one that was absolutely covered by scarab beetles! The greens and yellows in the plant complimented the beetles’ hue nicely.

Making collages out of bad iPod photos, no photoshop, and a dinky laptop is harder than it seems

Making collages out of bad iPod photos, no photoshop, and a dinky laptop is harder than it seems

Every morning I walk from the school (where the girls are staying) to the apothiki (where all the archaeological magic happens). It takes about 10 minutes if you walk at a slow, meandering, I’m-not-awake-yet pace, like me. It helps to know that the sky is more likely to be blue than a dreary grey, and that there are always wildflowers growing on either side of the road. They lend a nice flash of colour to the landscape. They can be seen when walking anywhere in the village: on the way to work, on the way to the Ouzeri or the Taverna, and back again. I’m particular to the poppies which were in full bloom the first day I arrived. They’ve wilted a bit since then, as have the daisies, but new dashes of vibrant flora catch my eye everyday.

Narthaki is wonderful for people who like to stop and smell the roses, but in many ways Kastro Kallithea is even better. The dig site is ruled by a variety of striking purple flowers standing stark amongst stone or tucked into the greenery blanketing the hill. There are all kinds of interesting species dispersed around the area, and it’s easy to get a great look at them when I’m staring at my feet making sure I’m not about to trip over anything! Hiking from place to place in Kallithea can be a bit challenging when you’re on a narrow path or climbing a particularly steep incline, but it’s well worth it in the end. Each stop on our tour of Kallithea revealed a couple cool new plants to look at (and, of course, a neat excavation site) including this weird spiky one that was absolutely covered by scarab beetles! The greens and yellows in the plant complimented the beetles’ hue nicely.

Not all plant-life at Kastro Kallithea is as welcoming as the flowers, photo courtesy of Google Images

Not all plant-life at Kastro Kallithea is as welcoming as the flowers, photo courtesy of Google Images

When we visited the site for the first time we were told quite emphatically that no matter how hot it was we needed to wear long pants. There was one simple reason for this: the pournari bushes. They covered the site in a menacing green sea of thorns and evil. Wearing pants kept me from losing any blood to the bushes and let me enjoy the view without worrying too much about where I was stepping. My sturdy hiking boots did the rest. As I am on the shorter side, my bare arms were in more danger of getting scratched than my legs! There’s a few dorky pictures of me floating around in which I’m wobbling through the narrower parts of the paths with my arms in the air, but they’re well worth it for the experience of getting to (painlessly) visit the excavation site where all the artefacts I’m working with at the apothiki were dug up. I’m extremely grateful for the opportunity.

But seriously, guys, wear pants

But seriously, guys, wear pants

 

 

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